02/10/2004

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Making Space Delivery Work

 

Dialogue Details

General space planning requirements include:

  • Location and boundaries of desired areas.
  • Term of occupancy.
  • Type of space required.
  • Size of space assignment.
  • Floorplate considerations.
  • Standard levels of service.
  • Standard finishes.
  • Networking and telecommunications.

End-users might also have special requirements that may alter standard planning activities. These might include such things as unusual occupancies; after-hours or continuous operations features such as lighting or glare control, ceiling height, or structure; high security; private toilets; child care; and more.

When it comes to space delivery, more often than not, the facility manager assumes the role of project manager – for better or for worse.

And, says Larry Vanderburgh, senior industry and academic advisor at the BOMI Institute, Arnold, MD, as project manager you’ll spend your time doing a careful dance in order to keep all involved parties satisfied.

Vanderburgh addressed the concept of successful space delivery during a November 2003 presentation at Buildings Show® @ NeoCon® East in Baltimore. He warned session participants about the hazards of today’s space planning endeavors.

“Projects don’t end these days,” he notes. “They mutate. You complete the blueprint, and someone asks you to add two more workstations or a 400-square-foot kitchen.”

Bear in mind that upfront planning is the key to success, both logistically and financially, Vanderburgh says. “The financial impact of decisions decreases as the project reaches the end,” he notes. “The beginning of the job is where you make your million dollar mistakes, and the end is where you recoup your $100 savings. You can save a lot of heartburn if you think of space planning as a budget exercise.”

Properly identifying the need – and not just requirements of the group as a whole, but also any special requirements – is key to a successful space plan. “If you don’t get this right, you can do the rest flawlessly and still screw up spectacularly,” Vanderburgh says.

So how do you determine what your company needs in this morass of choices? A simple space programming questionnaire, possibly implemented in combination with interviews of key personnel, can help shape the landscape of individual requirements.

For the broader scheme, use workspace templates that are based on space standards, if applicable. A space requirements report and program that cites a line-by-line listing of each workspace, circulation and layout factors, adjacencies, and total space requirements is another handy tool, Vanderburgh notes. For each area to be planned, ask: “Where should this office be and why is it there?”

But, he cautions, be sure that the space requirements report has a big line that says, “Yes, I am the right person to approve this plan.” If the person who signs off on it isn’t authorized to make these decisions, you’ll quickly learn that “time is money.”

You can take either an “inside-out approach,” where you shop for space to meet needs, or the less desirable “outside-in approach,” where company management has identified a block of space in a building and you have to fit the people in the existing area. Vanderburgh looks at this scenario as a sort of reverse engineering. It’s difficult, tedious, and if you can shop for space after needs are determined, you’re in a much better position.

“A company might need 10,000 square feet, but they’ve settled for a 9,200-square-foot space. You’ve got to squeeze that extra 800 square feet out of somewhere,” Vanderburgh says. “My guess is that they’ll want to squeeze in enough people until it is grounds for infidelity or cannibalism, whichever comes first. Simply put, a body is a body and it needs space.”

 


Visit our website today to learn about the design flexibility of a Morton building and the endless possibilities of partnering with our designBUILD team.


Wood construction is both cost and energy efficient. Check out Morton Buildings and our designBUILD team online today to discover all the benefits of post-frame construction.


When choosing a metal-clad building for your next construction project, consider Morton Buildings, Inc., and their designBUILD team, we’ll make your dream a reality.

We Can Help You Reduce Energy by 30%

Our mission is to help our customers manage their buildings' energy costs, improve reliability, and enhance performance while having a positive impact on the environment.
CLICK HERE to find out how.

Add highly responsive multi-zone comfort to any building project, in any climate. Our CITY MULTI H2i R2- and Y-Series VRF systems give you flexibility to fit the needs of any building. Enjoy 100% heating capacity at 0°F outdoor ambient, and 85% heating capacity at -13°F outdoor ambient.  For more information, log on to www.mitsubishipro.com


Visit our website today to learn about the design flexibility of a Morton building and the endless possibilities of partnering with our designBUILD team.


Wood construction is both cost and energy efficient. Check out Morton Buildings and our designBUILD team online today to discover all the benefits of post-frame construction.


When choosing a metal-clad building for your next construction project, consider Morton Buildings, Inc., and their designBUILD team, we’ll make your dream a reality.

We Can Help You Reduce Energy by 30%

Our mission is to help our customers manage their buildings' energy costs, improve reliability, and enhance performance while having a positive impact on the environment.
CLICK HERE to find out how.

Add highly responsive multi-zone comfort to any building project, in any climate. Our CITY MULTI H2i R2- and Y-Series VRF systems give you flexibility to fit the needs of any building. Enjoy 100% heating capacity at 0°F outdoor ambient, and 85% heating capacity at -13°F outdoor ambient.  For more information, log on to www.mitsubishipro.com

 
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