04/25/2007

The Business Case for Greening Your Facilities

By Jerry Yudelson

 

What’s going on here? In all of these cases, facilities managers and executives have discovered the business-case benefits of “going green.” In addition to saving energy (something which every organization is trying to do today, from Wal-Mart to your corner grocery store), these organizations are realizing savings on water use, chemical use, waste disposal, and other environmental measures.

If you own or manage buildings, you know that each dollar saved on energy adds $10 to $12 to the value of your building by increasing net operating income. If you think a 3-year “payback” on energy efficiency is too long to wait, try this way of thinking instead: A 3-year payback on a $100,000 investment adds $333,000 to $400,000 to the value of your building immediately. That’s right, a 330- to 400-percent return on investment – immediately! Do the math and stop talking “engineer speak”; instead, talk like the savvy investor you undoubtedly are when your own money is involved.

But, there’s more to the story: The positive public relations and employee relations give benefits that are hard to measure. In one project I looked at, the first LEED Silver-certified hotel in the country – the Vancouver (WA) Hilton, executives estimated that the value of the publicity they received upon opening was worth 10 times the extra cost of LEED certification.

What about employee retention? It costs $50,000 to $150,000 to replace a key employee (try hiring even a receptionist in less than 3 months in most large companies today). In today’s people-short economy, your valuable employees can literally walk down the street, get a 10-percent raise from a competitor, and not have to change their commuting or child-care arrangements. They want to stay with organizations that walk the talk of environmental and social responsibility; they want to see action, and a LEED-EB certification is one way to show you are serious about benchmarking your performance with the top organizations in the country.

You can also show your concern for energy conservation and carbon-dioxide emission reductions by participating in the ENERGY STAR program, which, to date, has certified more than 3,200 buildings for their efficiency. However, it does not have quite the overall sustainability cachet of a LEED rating.

As of April 2007, 356 projects representing more than 100 million square feet of building area had registered to certify their facilities under the LEED-EB program. You need to get this important benchmarking exercise into next year’s budget and start putting your organization’s sustainable intentions to the test.

There are other business benefits to be realized. Measuring your indoor air quality; making sure that non-toxic paints, sealants, and carpets are used in remodels and upgrades; and improving ventilation are key elements in risk management. Insurance companies are now looking at LEED certification as a risk-mitigation tool. Last fall, Fireman’s Fund became the first major company to offer a discount on commercial insurance for green buildings. Maybe you and your CFO should take a look at potential insurance cost savings and reduced risk of a successful lawsuit for “sick building syndrome” as a justification for a LEED-certification program for existing buildings, future tenant improvements, and any new buildings you’re planning to build or lease.

But, wait, there’s more! (Does this sound like a 1980s Ginsu knife commercial?) What about productivity enhancements? Every year, you’re going to spend $300 to $600 per square foot per year on people. Getting 5-percent improvements in productivity added to company revenues would just about pay for the entire rent on your building. Getting even a 1-percent improvement is equivalent to reducing your energy bill to zero. Productivity is the “low-hanging fruit.” Shouldn’t the COO of your organization be asked if he or she wants to cut rent and energy bills to zero? There’s plenty of back-up data to support the contention that this is entirely possible (just Google “Carnegie Mellon University” and “Ebids,” and you can download all this back-up information).

Did I remember to say that, if you’re a public company, Wall Street is interested in what you’re doing to green your company and make your operations more sustainable? One of my developer clients is in that position. After getting hammered with this question from analysts, the chief investment officer put out the word to the design and construction team: Form a task force and come back with every possible answer to that question. Wouldn’t you rather be in front of the curve than behind it, driving the sustainability train at your organization rather than getting run over by it?

What about your carbon footprint? Still think that has something to do with shoe size? The Conference Board reported last fall that 75 percent of 92 member companies surveyed (the largest companies in the land) were already measuring this in preparation for the day (not long distant) that there will be a “cap and trade” system for carbon-dioxide emissions. If you’re a large energy user, you need to start thinking about how to cut net energy use by 50 percent over a rather short time period, and then about how to cut it 50 percent again. If not for cost reasons, you’ll need to take this move to shrink your carbon footprint.

Energy and utility savings, reduced maintenance, enhanced building value, productivity gains, health-cost reductions, lower insurance costs, improved public relations and marketing, reduced risk of lawsuits, improved investor and stakeholder relations, greater employee retention and easier recruitment, peace of mind when top management calls: You can fill in the numbers. The business case for green buildings and greener facilities is clear.

The rationale is evident, the evidence is strong, and the choice to respond is yours. Understanding and articulating the business case for greening your facilities has never been more important to you, your career, or your organization. Put the case together for your top management; you might be surprised at how they react.


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Visit our website today to learn about the design flexibility of a Morton building and the endless possibilities of partnering with our designBUILD team.


Wood construction is both cost and energy efficient. Check out Morton Buildings and our designBUILD team online today to discover all the benefits of post-frame construction.


When choosing a metal-clad building for your next construction project, consider Morton Buildings, Inc., and their designBUILD team, we’ll make your dream a reality.

We Can Help You Reduce Energy by 30%

Our mission is to help our customers manage their buildings' energy costs, improve reliability, and enhance performance while having a positive impact on the environment.
CLICK HERE to find out how.

Add highly responsive multi-zone comfort to any building project, in any climate. Our CITY MULTI H2i R2- and Y-Series VRF systems give you flexibility to fit the needs of any building. Enjoy 100% heating capacity at 0°F outdoor ambient, and 85% heating capacity at -13°F outdoor ambient.  For more information, log on to www.mitsubishipro.com


Visit our website today to learn about the design flexibility of a Morton building and the endless possibilities of partnering with our designBUILD team.


Wood construction is both cost and energy efficient. Check out Morton Buildings and our designBUILD team online today to discover all the benefits of post-frame construction.


When choosing a metal-clad building for your next construction project, consider Morton Buildings, Inc., and their designBUILD team, we’ll make your dream a reality.

We Can Help You Reduce Energy by 30%

Our mission is to help our customers manage their buildings' energy costs, improve reliability, and enhance performance while having a positive impact on the environment.
CLICK HERE to find out how.

Add highly responsive multi-zone comfort to any building project, in any climate. Our CITY MULTI H2i R2- and Y-Series VRF systems give you flexibility to fit the needs of any building. Enjoy 100% heating capacity at 0°F outdoor ambient, and 85% heating capacity at -13°F outdoor ambient.  For more information, log on to www.mitsubishipro.com

 
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