Organizations Oppose Effort to Subvert Energy Bill

02/28/2014 |

There are efforts to repeal the law setting goals for reducing fossil fuel use in federal buildings.

Nearly 1,000 organizations, including the American Institute of Architects, are urging Congress to reject special interest efforts to repeal the law setting goals for reducing fossil fuel use in federal buildings by 2030.

Specifically, the organizations released a letter urging the rejection of the proposal to repeal Section 433 of the Energy Independence and Security Act. This is in response to reports that the oil and gas lobby are behind the repeal.

“It is unfortunate that the fossil fuel industry has demanded gutting federal energy laws through in the Shaheen-Portman bill,” said AIA CEO Robert Ivy. “Senators Shaheen and Portman have spent more than two years crafting a bipartisan energy efficiency bill. We support the original bill, which has many admirable provisions, but cannot in good conscience support legislation that undermines laws that help the federal government save taxpayers money by conserving energy.”

Last year, the Senate Energy and Natural Resources Committee approved the otherwise bipartisan Shaheen-Portman bill that encourages families, businesses and the government to save energy. It is currently unclear whether the revised bill can move forward in its current form.

“We remain committed to finding consensus solutions to improve Section 433,” Ivy said. “But so long as its opponents demand a full repeal, we do not believe the bill serves the interests of the American public.”

The letter states that design and construction companies across the country are already designing buildings that meet, and in some cases exceed, the current targets in Section 433.

A full text of the letter can be found on the AIA website.

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